Calif Supreme Court OKs arrest warrants without names, based solely on DNA profile

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - The California Supreme Court has authorized so-called "John Doe" arrest warrants that contain only a DNA profile of an unknown suspect.

Police agencies are increasingly using no-name warrants to get around statute-of-limitation issues. DNA collected from a crime scene is described in the warrant and when a match is made, the suspect can be arrested even decades later.

The state high court on Monday upheld the rape conviction of Paul Robinson, who was arrested A month after the six-year statute of limitations expired on the case. The justices, in a 5-2 decision, said an arrest warrant without Robinson's name but with his DNA profile issued before the expiration is valid.

The court ruled that a DNA profile is specific enough to justify an arrest warrant.

Information contributed by: Associated Press